Tuesday, June 23, 2015

How To Be A Good Son

Father and Son Relationship Quotes
How To Be A Good Son
There was a boy of average built and average looks, but with an oddly beautiful smile and at same time, kind of angst in his eyes, which negates his averageness, make him special. If you ask him about his ambitions, he laughs a bit and then retort, he doesn’t have any high ambition but just to have a secure life, which his father couldn’t afford him, and which is why he is working while his friends make play.

He used to work in town’s ice factory on Sundays, or every other day, when his school was closed. He was outstanding in maths and stats, which earned him good reputation among fellow students and teachers. Everything was simply going well, until one day, he revolts against his father because of their shabby condition they live in. He wants to leave his studies for proper work. Eventually he drops his studies, and starts working in some food factory, which earned him good money and a lunch for free.

In another factory of same man, his father was a clerk. And when he saw his son working for the same man. He meets and informs the man about his son. He also inquires, how he is progressing. The man assures him, but father was still restless.

Meanwhile, the father repeatedly asks the boy, to resume his studies, as new academic session is fast approaching. But he was reluctant to hear any of his father’s argument, and wants to continue his work, one because of their miser conditions and second he was earning some money with which he can buy things for himself and his little brother. Though, the father who knows about the fact, they work under same employer but in different institution. He pleads to his employer to encourage his son to resume his studies.

His employer asks the boy to resume his studies, not because of his father, who is a loyal employee and was working with him for past five years, and also not because he helps his own son in mathematics and stats. Though because of he also likes the boy, and he also want him to grow. Don’t know why, and reasons unbeknownst to him only, but one thing is sure, he wants him to succeed. He eventually persuades the boy to resume his studies, with a promise to fund his education. But the boy was reluctant, and he did not accept the offer straightway, but he argued to do work after school and on holidays as well. To which his employer, asked him to work with his son in studies, not in factory.

The boy completes his studies, and eventually secures a government job, which he humbly blames that he just got lucky. He, then marries a girl, who is little ambitious and have dreams of her own. But she moulds her dreams to match his. Within first year of their marriage, they have a boy and two year later, they have another boy.

With passing years, he accumulated little wealth. He also helped his brother to open a grocery store. He transforms their ramshackle home into a beautiful house. And he was hailed by community, the good son. But his angst for his father never depleted, rather say increased. For him, he was a complete failure, who did not provide him a secure life. His beautiful and heart-warming smile has lost somewhere in between the grin, he now always have.

When his first son completes his schooling, he asks his son to do engineering, though he knows the fact that his son wants to study something else and he does not want to be an engineer. Though, at first his son accepts his decision but a year after he revolts against him. And his son develops that very strange angst against him, which he had against his own father.

He leaves engineering in the middle way, which creates a rift between the man and his son. Though this rift shakes him too much that he broke down in front of his friend, who was the son of his employer. He complains his friend, how his son revolts against him, and how he eventually rose to such life in shadow of his reluctant father and how his son is ruining everything again. But his friend who knows all about him and his father, thanks to his father, corrects him and tells him how much sacrifices his father made for him, and how his father plead his father to persuade you to resume your studies. And how often he worked overtime to get things, what you and your brother wants.

And after all these revelations, he finds his father and himself in a new light. He goes to his father, and hugs him for very time in two odd springs. He asks for the forgiveness. And say, he was never a good son, he never understood his father. And his father wipes his tears and says, he is very good son. And the only thing he regrets that he couldn’t hug him for last twenty springs.

On evening, when his son came back home he was surprised to see his father and grandfather, laughing and sharing cup of tea. Though he has something to show to his father but he decides not to show that and starts walking toward his room. His father felts his presence and on seeing him ask him to join them. It was unusual and he was feeling little reluctant. Sensing his son reluctance, he stood up, and hugs him, and whisper something in his ears, I am sorry son, you are not wrong. To which he replies, I am sorry dad, I am not yours good son. And on which he smiles and pokes, it’s okay, I can have a bad son who is a good artist. Now have some tea with us.

While all of the family having tea and nice laugh, the man sees something, it was a certificate of third position in some local painting competition, entitled to his son. And he asks his son, it’s yours. And son nods.

Epilogue
There is no absolute answer to how to be a good son not for how to be a good father. The father-son relationship is unarguably most complex one in this world. And no one can really define the rules for this love-hate tug of war. I believe, all it takes a hug, sometimes.

Notes:
If you thinking about who are these characters in this story and do they exist in real life. So, I confess they are the real life inspired one and very close to my heart.

“I am participating in the ‘#HugYourDad’ activity for Vicks in association with BlogAdda.”

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